Mobilizing Opportunities: The Evolving Latino Electorate and Future of American Politics

The CLRC Research Cluster, Politics of Forced Migration, welcomes Ricardo Ramírez, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame. Professor Ramírez discusses his book, Mobilizing Opportunities: The Evolving Latino Electorate and Future of American Politics, on Friday, May 16, 2014, 12:00-1:30pm, in the Charles E. Merrill Lounge.

April 29, 2014

The growth of the Latino population is the most significant demographic shift in the United States today.  Yet growth alone cannot explain this population’s increasing impact on the electorate; nor can a parsing of its subethnicities.  In Mobilizing Opportunities:  The Evolving Latino Electorate and Future of American Politics (University of Virginia Press, 2013), Ricardo Ramírez identifies when and where Latino participation in the political process has come about as well as its many motivations.  Using a state-centered approach, the author focuses on the interaction between demographic factors and political contexts, from long-term trends in party competition, to the resources and mobilization efforts of ethnic organizations and the Spanish-language media, to the perception of political threat as a basis for mobilization.  The picture that emerges is one of great temporal and geographic variation.  In it, Ramírez captures the transformation of Latinos’ civic and political reality and the engines behind the evolution of this crucial electorate.

RicardoRamirez.HeadshotRicardo Ramírez is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame.  In addition to Mobilizing Opportunities, he is the co-editor of Transforming Politics, Transforming America:  The Political and Civic Incorporation of Immigrants in the United States (University of Virginia Press, 2006) and is Principal Investigator of a longitudinal study of gendered career paths among Latina/o elected officials since 1990.  His broad research interests include political behavior, state and local politics, and the politics of race and ethnicity. His research is geared to understanding the transformation of civic and political participation in American democracy by focusing on the effects of political context on participation, the political mobilization of and outreach to Latino immigrants and other minority groups, and the causes and consequences of increasing diversity among elected officials.

The Chicano Latino Research Center Politics of Forced Migration Research Cluster is proud to co-sponsor this free, public event with the University of California Center for Collaborative Research for an Equitable California